Australia's Kimberley: Voyage to the Outback

April 24, 2015 - May 8, 2015

Especially chosen for this voyage, our team of expert leaders and lecturers serves to bring a comprehensive educational component to your adventure through lectures, guided excursions, and daily recaps.

Jeff Gneiser (Expedition Leader)

Jeff Gneiser

Mountaineer, ski instructor, sailor and scuba diving professional - all of these titles describe Jeff's ability to share the outdoors with others. His appreciation for nature's pristine beauty and awesome power is rivaled only by his love for the sea. Jeff spent his summers working on charter boats, sailing and taking passengers scuba diving. After graduating with a bachelor of science in computer/electrical engineering at the University of Colorado, Jeff returned to the travel industry as a dive instructor and expedition leader. In the past decade, Jeff has earned his 100-ton U.S.

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Lynne Greig

Lynne Greig

Lynne was born and raised in South Africa and after finishing her education spent several years teaching there. Her love for travel led her around the globe, and eventually turned into a career in the adventure travel industry as cruise director. Since 1995 she has traveled from Antarctica to the Arctic, through Africa and the Indian Ocean, Russia, the South Pacific, and Australia. Voyages have taken Lynne to every continent and across every ocean aboard expedition vessels ranging from Russian icebreakers to Australian catamarans.

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Shirley Campbell

Shirley Campbell

Dr. Shirley Campbell is a social anthropologist and Research Fellow at the Australian National University, with a special interest in the indigenous peoples of Australia, Melanesia, and the Pacific. More than three decades of academic research and university teaching have led to a sound knowledge and understanding of many cultures around the world and the theoretical foundations that human societies share.

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Brad Climpson

Brad Climpson

Brad was born in Sydney, Australia and has lived for the last 20 years in North Queensland, on the edge of the Great Barrier Reef. In 1996 he earned a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in marine biology and zoology at James Cook University, Townsville. With the Great Barrier Reef serving as both playground and laboratory, Brad has developed an intimate knowledge of how complex reef systems work.

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Chris Done

Chris Done

Chris has lived and worked in Western Australia’s remote Kimberley region for nearly thirty years. As the former regional manager for the state’s Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM), he has traveled extensively throughout the area cultivating an in-depth understanding of its flora, fauna, Aboriginal art, and geology, as well as its history, culture, and management issues. He has been involved in tourism and expeditions to the region since 1990, including guest lecturing on most of Zegrahm’s Kimberley voyages.

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Terry Done

Terry Done

Dr. Terry Done is a marine biologist and coral reef researcher formerly at James Cook University and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), where he progressed through the ranks of Research Scientist until his retirement in 2007. He has been an advisor to governments in Australia, the United States, and Indonesia on coral reef science and management, and he has written over 80 scientific papers with a focus on coral reefs, including their ecology, processes of reef growth, effects of fishing and pollution, and the effects of global climate change.

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Brent Stephenson

Brent Stephenson

Born in New Zealand and has been a birder since childhood. In 2005 he completed a goal he had had from a young age, with the conclusion of his Ph.D., studying the breeding biology of Australasian gannets in New Zealand. This further heightened his interest in seabirds, and in 2003, along with Sav Saville, he rediscovered the “extinct” New Zealand storm-petrel, a bird known previously from only three museum specimens collected during the 1800s. With support from National Geographic, he led a team conducting further research on this enigmatic seabird.

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