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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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Bikini Atoll
September 13, 2010
Blog Post

There are not many places one can travel to these days where one’s heart weeps and sings at the same time. The story of Bikini Atoll is like none other. Our historian, Susan Langley, and anthropologist, Shirley Campbell, brought to life the ineffable devastation caused by all the nuclear testing carried out here by the Americans after WWII. The story of struggle suffered by the displaced islanders is still raw in their hearts.

And yet, under the waves, the fishes and the corals are...

Gam Island
March 2, 2010
Blog Post

In perfect Zegrahm style, we combined four expedition days in to one. The birders left when the moon was still full and bright, in search for the red bird of paradise. Jonathan was hopeful they’d see one or two red “bops” fly overhead. It wasn’t so…they saw 6 males and many females—truly beyond expectations!

The rest of the group visited the village of Yanwapnor. Some went in search of a lost orchid, which had been rediscovered in the village, while others strolled down the well...

Ashmore Reef
February 23, 2010
Blog Post

G’day. I have enjoyed the extreme good fortune to live on the shores adjacent to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) for a little over 15 years. I stopped counting the number of dives I’ve made on this World Heritage listed biological marvel, when the number reached into the thousands. When you’ve been this lucky, it’s easy to forget what a privilege it is to access and utilize the individual reefs of it’s make up. So when one gets the opportunity to visit the less accessible outliers it is...

Gold Harbour, South Georgia
December 3, 2008
Blog Post

South Georgia exceeded even our wildest expectations. As we head for the Antarctic Peninsula, I am overwhelmed with a sense of awe that there still exists a place of such wild and rugged beauty and where wildlife reigns in concentrations and diversity that has to be seen to be believed. Our expedition began on the north coast and we cruised down the eastern side of the island, calling at bays, coves, harbors, and fjords along the way.

The Bay of Isles served as our introduction, the...

Rangiroa, Tuamotu Islands
September 16, 2008
Blog Post

Lanky palms, ultramarine waters, soaring peaks, a rich cultural heritage, a celebrated list of visitors-turned-residents–and all of it blended with that French je ne sais quoi…makes Tahiti the perfect beginning and end point for an adventure that will take us counter-clockwise around Polynesia.

We began our first full day driving the island's outer ring road that follows the dazzling coast and offers incredible inland views of verdant valleys and rugged peaks. Our amicable Tahitian...

Bigge Island
January 19, 2008
Blog Post

More than 50,000 years ago Australia’s original inhabitants arrived from Sundaland (Southeast Asia). They arrived in the area we now call the Kimberley, the northwest corner of the land of Sahul, or greater Australia. How and why they came here is the subject of great conjecture and debate but it is certain that they had to make significant sea crossings to do so. These were, in all probability, the first open sea journeys undertaken by homo sapiens—in an ancient time that surely...

Palm Trees
October 19, 2007
Blog Post

The coconut palm—that elegant lanky symbol for tropical island paradise—is also one of the most fascinating trees on the planet. Its statistics honor the Cocos nucifera—literally monkey-face nut fruit—with superlatives: It has the largest leaf in the plant kingdom, the largest seed, the largest inflorescence (flower cluster), and is one of the oldest known flowering plants—fossils date it back to some 120 million years ago, to the Cretaceous period, or Age of Dinosaurs.

No one is...

Kofiau Archipelago, Raja Ampat
October 19, 2007
Blog Post

Growing up in southeastern Pennsylvania, there was neither an ocean nor was the term biodiversity ever used. But I was fascinated with fish. Like my Dad and Grandpa Grove, I loved to go fishing in the local streams and the Susquehanna River for rainbow trout, shad, and bass. During summer vacations on the Atlantic coast, croaker, blue fish, and flounder danced in my dreams, and sometimes on the end of my line. I was also enthralled watching fish in aquariums; I even had one of my own in...

January 19, 2007
Blog Post

If it's a given that the best moments of a journey happen spontaneously, then the Expedition Stop day on a Zegrahm itinerary is surely serendipity in its finest hour. In our brochures, among the carefully crafted day by day descriptions, those words dangle a tantalizing lure to those of us easily reeled in by the promise of adventure.

I recently had the pleasure of joining my first Zegrahm voyage-Brunei to Bali-aboard the Clipper Odyssey. First times to any...

Mangrove near Aldabra Atoll
April 19, 2006
Blog Post

What plant appears to walk out and over water, grows its roots upward to "breathe," has seeds that germinate before they fall, eliminates salt from its pores, and serves as a nursery for baby tropical fish?

Why, the incredible, inter-tidal, flowering mangrove, of course! This tropical and sub-tropical tree boasts a unique adaptability that allows it to make a happy home in the harshest of conditions--a twice-daily immersion in salt water, and heavy, stinky mud without oxygen to...

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