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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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Turkish Rug, Kas, Turkey
October 20, 2000
Blog Post

History was always a bit of a no-go area for me at school. Our history teacher was more renowned for his remarkably somnolent lectures, rather than his history teaching abilities. For that reason, amongst others, history was never my favorite subject and instead my interests thrived in other areas, such as biology. However, my jaded view of history was brought to an abrupt end in October of 1998 on Zegrahm's Crossroads of Empires expeditions.

I was appointed as the natural historian...

Agrigento, Sicily
September 8, 2011
Blog Post

We are now cruising from our first five days in Sicily towards the Adriatic Sea and the wonders of Croatia, Montenegro, and Albania. Sicily was full of marvels. We began in Palermo and Monreale, where the 12th-century churches and chapels were adorned with magnificent mosaics from floor to ceiling. The Palatine Chapel in Palermo was especially memorable, like a jewel-box of medieval art. We enjoyed exploring the labyrinthine streets of the medieval hilltop town of Erice and the beautifully...

Agrigento, Sicily
April 7, 2011
Blog Post

Within the sprawling, expansive Valley of the Temples, outside Agrigento, runs a narrow, rocky ridge. The ridge is visible from all points of the valley, and from far out to sea. At one time, long ago, the valley was filled with one of the most lavish cities of the entire Grecian Empire, and the ridge was its centerpiece. Along it stood a row of magnificent temples dedicated to the most powerful gods of these people, like a row of knuckles along a clenched fist. Now the city has vanished,...

Dancers, Albania
September 15, 2011
Blog Post

Our ship made a calm crossing on the deep blue Mediterranean from Sicily to the Adriatic Sea and the beautiful shores of Montenegro, Croatia, and Albania. Our first Adriatic stop was in Montenegro. Sailing there was itself an event, winding our way through the dramatically curving coastline of the fjord-like Bay of Kotor. There, tucked away at the base of a looming rocky mountain, rested one of the jewels of the Adriatic, the walled Venetian town of Kotor, a renaissance city frozen...

Monreale
April 9, 2011
Blog Post

The history of Sicily is a list of foreign conquerors. The island was a Greek colony, then Carthaginian, next Roman, then Byzantine, followed by Moorish, Norman, and Spanish. It didn’t become part of Italy until 1860. Each ruling dynasty left its mark on Sicily—and we saw the marks of a variety of them today, from the Roman theatre at Segesta to the medieval mountaintop village of Erice to the Moorish architecture of Monreale.

A couple of things stood out for me. First, the hike down...

Opera House, Odessa
October 3, 2008
Blog Post

I just returned home after leading two fantastic Circumnavigation of the Black Sea voyages! The Black Sea explorations are ever-changing and each year it seems there are new opportunities. On these recent voyages, for the first time, we were able to visit the famous Odessa Opera House.

Our tour agent in the Ukraine, Janna Belousova, and Zegrahm staff member, Olga Stone, worked together to obtain special permission from the director for an insiders tour of...

Syracuse, Sicily
April 19, 2010
Blog Post

There was a brisk breeze blowing, but it was a sunny morning as we sailed into the great harbor at Syracuse and perhaps we had something of the same experience of those first Greek colonists from Corinth who arrived more than 2,700 years ago to their new land. Cautious people, they settled on the small offshore island of Ortygia where archaeological excavations have indicated there was already a settlement of native huts. I doubt that they suspected their town was going to become the largest...

Valletta, Malta
April 15, 2010
Blog Post

The Romans certainly had it right when they called their settlement in the center of this island Melita, a derivation of "honey," whether for the honey they produced or the ubiquitous honey-colored limestone. The stone from which virtually all buildings are made, deepens in color as it weathers and lends a pleasant homogeneity to the place that harmonizes with the environment whether urban or rural. It's the perfect season to visit as everything is blooming making the fields, gardens, and...

Amphoras at the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology
April 19, 2007
Blog Post

In 1960, George F. Bass, then a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, learned to dive in order to excavate a Bronze Age shipwreck off Cape Gelidonya, on Turkey's southern coast. This was the first scientific excavation of a site beneath the water, and not only represented a revolution in archaeology, but also helped rewrite scholars' understanding of ancient trade in the Mediterranean three thousand years ago.

The example...

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