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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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Agrigento, Sicily
June 8, 2016
Blog Post

Susan Langley is the State Underwater Archaeologist for the Maryland Historical Trust. She received her B.A. in anthropology from the University of Toronto and her M.A. and Ph.D. in archaeology from the University of Calgary. Her long-standing interest is updating international and national heritage protection legislation, to which end she often consults...

Sumela Monastery
May 17, 2016
Blog Post

Susan Langley is the State Underwater Archaeologist for the Maryland Historical Trust. She received her B.A. in anthropology from the University of Toronto and her M.A. and Ph.D. in archaeology from the University of Calgary. Her long-standing interest is updating international and national heritage protection legislation, to which end she often consults...

Dubrovnik, Croatia
April 21, 2009
Blog Post

Springtime is the best time to be in the Adriatic. The hillsides are ablaze with poppies, irises, and gorse and the medieval walled cities are filled with festivals of the season. We watched Easter Pageants in Malta and Sicily and toured the palaces, archaeological sites, and bustling mountain-top bazaars of Corfu and Albania.

In Montenegro we spent the early morning on deck watching as our ship navigated the winding fjord of Boka Kotorska. Once we were alongside beneath the walls of...

The Fabled Adriatic
March 20, 2009
Blog Post

As lifelong adventurers we are constantly seeking our own secret paths. When we were children these paths might have begun with the simple shortcuts home from school, through a neighbor’s yard, or across a wild meadow. Later, these paths took the form of roads and hidden delights we discovered while extending the borders of our surroundings, venturing farther afield and around the globe.

Now our travels take us to foreign cities and villages where we wander labyrinthine...

Mediterranean Diet
December 31, 2010
Blog Post

More information on the island’s cuisine is preserved in The Life of Luxury written around 350 B.C. by another Sicilian, Archestratus of Syracuse, who has often been called the “Father of Gastronomy.” Written not in prose, but in poetry, this was less of a how-to cooking manual, and more of an epicurean travelogue in which Archestratus, an inveterate traveler, described his journeys as far as the Black Sea in order to satisfy his hunger for good food. His work described the what,...

Agrigento, Sicily
September 8, 2011
Blog Post

We are now cruising from our first five days in Sicily towards the Adriatic Sea and the wonders of Croatia, Montenegro, and Albania. Sicily was full of marvels. We began in Palermo and Monreale, where the 12th-century churches and chapels were adorned with magnificent mosaics from floor to ceiling. The Palatine Chapel in Palermo was especially memorable, like a jewel-box of medieval art. We enjoyed exploring the labyrinthine streets of the medieval hilltop town of Erice and the beautifully...

Agrigento, Sicily
April 7, 2011
Blog Post

Within the sprawling, expansive Valley of the Temples, outside Agrigento, runs a narrow, rocky ridge. The ridge is visible from all points of the valley, and from far out to sea. At one time, long ago, the valley was filled with one of the most lavish cities of the entire Grecian Empire, and the ridge was its centerpiece. Along it stood a row of magnificent temples dedicated to the most powerful gods of these people, like a row of knuckles along a clenched fist. Now the city has vanished,...

Dancers, Albania
September 15, 2011
Blog Post

Our ship made a calm crossing on the deep blue Mediterranean from Sicily to the Adriatic Sea and the beautiful shores of Montenegro, Croatia, and Albania. Our first Adriatic stop was in Montenegro. Sailing there was itself an event, winding our way through the dramatically curving coastline of the fjord-like Bay of Kotor. There, tucked away at the base of a looming rocky mountain, rested one of the jewels of the Adriatic, the walled Venetian town of Kotor, a renaissance city frozen...

Monreale
April 9, 2011
Blog Post

The history of Sicily is a list of foreign conquerors. The island was a Greek colony, then Carthaginian, next Roman, then Byzantine, followed by Moorish, Norman, and Spanish. It didn’t become part of Italy until 1860. Each ruling dynasty left its mark on Sicily—and we saw the marks of a variety of them today, from the Roman theatre at Segesta to the medieval mountaintop village of Erice to the Moorish architecture of Monreale.

A couple of things stood out for me. First, the hike down...

Syracuse, Sicily
April 19, 2010
Blog Post

There was a brisk breeze blowing, but it was a sunny morning as we sailed into the great harbor at Syracuse and perhaps we had something of the same experience of those first Greek colonists from Corinth who arrived more than 2,700 years ago to their new land. Cautious people, they settled on the small offshore island of Ortygia where archaeological excavations have indicated there was already a settlement of native huts. I doubt that they suspected their town was going to become the largest...

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