Beyond the DestinationYour World. Our Perspective.

Zegrahm Blog Header

Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

Your search had 40 results.
Kakaban Island, Indonesia
December 4, 2012
Blog Post

In the spring of 2013, travel to a world of fascinating cultures, luscious landscapes, and an amazing diversity of tropical flora, fauna, and marine life. A place where orangutans and jellyfish provide fodder for stories that will amaze your friends and family for years to come.

In 2006, Rodica W. joined her first Zegrahm voyage, Brunei to Bali, and learned the true meaning of the phrase, 'Expedition Stop.'

“On the sixth day of the voyage, just as we were...

Trobriand Islands, Melanesia
October 20, 2003
Blog Post

When asked to name my favorite part of the world, I invariably single out the islands of Melanesia and Micronesia. These archipelagos, spread across a vast span of the western tropical Pacific, captivated me in the early 1980s when I first encountered them during a voyage aboard the Explorer.

Assuming the duties of Zegrahm CEO meant that I had to sharply curtail my activities in the field in order to plan and oversee our programs from the Seattle office. Of course, as CEO I...

Bikini Atoll
September 13, 2010
Blog Post

There are not many places one can travel to these days where one’s heart weeps and sings at the same time. The story of Bikini Atoll is like none other. Our historian, Susan Langley, and anthropologist, Shirley Campbell, brought to life the ineffable devastation caused by all the nuclear testing carried out here by the Americans after WWII. The story of struggle suffered by the displaced islanders is still raw in their hearts.

And yet, under the waves, the fishes and the corals are...

Chatham Islands
December 16, 2009
Blog Post

It’s not often that the partners of Zegrahm Expeditions visit a place where none of us have ever been. So when the Clipper Odyssey pulled into the Chatham Islands, our final destination on the inaugural Wild Edge of the Pacific trip, the excitement was palpable.

The previous evening, while sailing in from Gisborne (on the “mainland,” as the Chatham Islanders prefer to call the North Island), had given the birders a taste of what lay in store when we’d...

Pearls, Tuamotus, Polynesia
November 18, 2009
Blog Post

After many hours of travel and some needed rest, we awoke in our rooms at the Intercontinental Resort Tahiti to the magnificent views of Moorea Island across the water. We were finally in French Polynesia! The day was stunning and we enjoyed the soft air on our skin as we embarked on an island tour.

A memorable stop at a black pearl farm proved to be quite educational as we learned about the process of seeding, harvesting, and grading of precious black pearls....

Bristle-thighed curlews
September 11, 2008
Blog Post

Malden and Starbuck Islands are the northernmost islands of the southern part of the Line Islands in the Republic of Kiribati. Both Malden and Starbuck are coral atolls and were mined extensively from the late 1800s until the early 1900s for phosphates. Phosphate deposits are guano deposited by seabirds over the countless years that the islands have stood above the surface of the sea. Used for fertilizers and during WWII for explosives, guano contains about...

Bigge Island
January 19, 2008
Blog Post

More than 50,000 years ago Australia’s original inhabitants arrived from Sundaland (Southeast Asia). They arrived in the area we now call the Kimberley, the northwest corner of the land of Sahul, or greater Australia. How and why they came here is the subject of great conjecture and debate but it is certain that they had to make significant sea crossings to do so. These were, in all probability, the first open sea journeys undertaken by homo sapiens—in an ancient time that surely...

Palm Trees
October 19, 2007
Blog Post

The coconut palm—that elegant lanky symbol for tropical island paradise—is also one of the most fascinating trees on the planet. Its statistics honor the Cocos nucifera—literally monkey-face nut fruit—with superlatives: It has the largest leaf in the plant kingdom, the largest seed, the largest inflorescence (flower cluster), and is one of the oldest known flowering plants—fossils date it back to some 120 million years ago, to the Cretaceous period, or Age of Dinosaurs.

No one is...

Kofiau Archipelago, Raja Ampat
October 19, 2007
Blog Post

Growing up in southeastern Pennsylvania, there was neither an ocean nor was the term biodiversity ever used. But I was fascinated with fish. Like my Dad and Grandpa Grove, I loved to go fishing in the local streams and the Susquehanna River for rainbow trout, shad, and bass. During summer vacations on the Atlantic coast, croaker, blue fish, and flounder danced in my dreams, and sometimes on the end of my line. I was also enthralled watching fish in aquariums; I even had one of my own in...

Outrigger Canoe
March 19, 2005
Blog Post

To me the perfect icon for Oceania's tropical island people would be the common canoe, crafted from a single log and fitted with an outrigger for balance. This ubiquitous little boat typifies not only the craftsmanship of island people, but is a world-class example of environmental sustainability at its very best. The canoe of today, virtually identical to those described by Captain Cook, is still constructed of local natural materials and recycled when its journeys are finished. These boats...

Pages

Subscribe to