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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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The Fabled Adriatic
March 20, 2009
Blog Post

As lifelong adventurers we are constantly seeking our own secret paths. When we were children these paths might have begun with the simple shortcuts home from school, through a neighbor’s yard, or across a wild meadow. Later, these paths took the form of roads and hidden delights we discovered while extending the borders of our surroundings, venturing farther afield and around the globe.

Now our travels take us to foreign cities and villages where we wander labyrinthine...

Bornholm Island, Denmark
March 31, 2011
Blog Post

In my many years of travel, I have found that each season seems to claim a region for her own and is the place she brings out her very best.

Spring chooses the Mediterranean and fills the shores with bird-song and a colorful explosion of wild flowers. Autumn picks the Black Sea after harvest, when families gather and tables groan under the weight of feasts and wines. And summer has chosen the Baltic, where she lengthens her days and breaks out her best along the southern amber shores...

Mediterranean Diet
December 31, 2010
Blog Post

More information on the island’s cuisine is preserved in The Life of Luxury written around 350 B.C. by another Sicilian, Archestratus of Syracuse, who has often been called the “Father of Gastronomy.” Written not in prose, but in poetry, this was less of a how-to cooking manual, and more of an epicurean travelogue in which Archestratus, an inveterate traveler, described his journeys as far as the Black Sea in order to satisfy his hunger for good food. His work described the what,...

Agrigento, Sicily
April 7, 2011
Blog Post

Within the sprawling, expansive Valley of the Temples, outside Agrigento, runs a narrow, rocky ridge. The ridge is visible from all points of the valley, and from far out to sea. At one time, long ago, the valley was filled with one of the most lavish cities of the entire Grecian Empire, and the ridge was its centerpiece. Along it stood a row of magnificent temples dedicated to the most powerful gods of these people, like a row of knuckles along a clenched fist. Now the city has vanished,...

Dancers, Albania
September 15, 2011
Blog Post

Our ship made a calm crossing on the deep blue Mediterranean from Sicily to the Adriatic Sea and the beautiful shores of Montenegro, Croatia, and Albania. Our first Adriatic stop was in Montenegro. Sailing there was itself an event, winding our way through the dramatically curving coastline of the fjord-like Bay of Kotor. There, tucked away at the base of a looming rocky mountain, rested one of the jewels of the Adriatic, the walled Venetian town of Kotor, a renaissance city frozen...

Monreale
April 9, 2011
Blog Post

The history of Sicily is a list of foreign conquerors. The island was a Greek colony, then Carthaginian, next Roman, then Byzantine, followed by Moorish, Norman, and Spanish. It didn’t become part of Italy until 1860. Each ruling dynasty left its mark on Sicily—and we saw the marks of a variety of them today, from the Roman theatre at Segesta to the medieval mountaintop village of Erice to the Moorish architecture of Monreale.

A couple of things stood out for me. First, the hike down...

Syracuse, Sicily
April 19, 2011
Blog Post

The claim to fame of many towns, in America and elsewhere, is that somebody famous was born there. In most cases it’s an author or a Civil War general. If the town is very lucky, it might be a movie star. Syracuse, too, has its names to drop, but in a place where history and greatness reach back as far as this one, the situation is a little different. Our guide today quite casually mentioned Syracuse’s favorite son—Archimedes, the greatest mathematician and inventor of the ancient world and...

Opera House, Odessa
October 3, 2008
Blog Post

I just returned home after leading two fantastic Circumnavigation of the Black Sea voyages! The Black Sea explorations are ever-changing and each year it seems there are new opportunities. On these recent voyages, for the first time, we were able to visit the famous Odessa Opera House.

Our tour agent in the Ukraine, Janna Belousova, and Zegrahm staff member, Olga Stone, worked together to obtain special permission from the director for an insiders tour of...

Amasya, Turkey
September 24, 2009
Blog Post

On the Black Sea, history lies in many layers. Jason and the Argonauts rowed these waters searching for the Golden Fleece. Mark Twain explored this sea in the 1800's on the ship, Quaker City, perhaps the first voyage of its kind. We travel though this sea experiencing history, past and present, first-hand.

Above the Turkish town of Amasya, Pontic kings, (scions of Alexander’s fractured empire) were buried in tombs carved into cliffs. During our hike above the Izilirmak river...

Cappadocia, Turkey
January 19, 2010
Blog Post

Zegrahm's Turkey tour partner was born in the Caucasus Mountains. Having covered every mile of his beloved homeland, Yasar Karadag has educated travelers for over 20 years on its cultural, archaeological, and natural splendors.

It seems that the longer I work in the world of travel the greater my pride in my homeland. Not only was I born in the same country as Homer, Herodotus, St. Paul, and Mevlana, but I am privileged to carry on the tradition of recalling their legacies...

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