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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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Antarctic Sunset
July 25, 2017
Blog Post

On August 21, the moon will pass in front of the sun and the sky will turn completely dark in the middle of the day. Total solar eclipses like this occur approximately once every 18 months, but they’re usually only visible from less than half a percent of the Earth’s surface. This will be the first total solar eclipse visible in the United States since 1979.

Despite the brevity of this phenomenon, its rarity makes it an experience stargazers do not want to miss....

Canal to Cuba with Panama, Costa Rica & Colombia
July 21, 2017
Blog Post

We’ve been traveling to Central America—including Panama, Costa Rica, and Cuba—for nearly two decades; in that time, we’ve honed an incredible itinerary, filled with stunning sights both above and below the waterline. Even our expedition staff is eager to return! Find out why, below:

 

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Torres del Paine National Park
July 7, 2017
Blog Post

Tom Sharpe is a geologist originally from Glasgow, Scotland, who has spent the last 35 years as a geology curator in the National Museum of Wales. He is a Chartered Geologist, a Fellow of the Geological Society, and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, as well as a member of a dozen other geological and polar societies. Here, Tom shares...

 Tortuguero Canals, Costa Rica
June 20, 2017
Blog Post

After nearly 20 years of traveling professionally, I’ve found very few countries that I would gladly visit over and over again. Costa Rica is the rare exception, thanks in large part to its friendly people, stunning natural beauty, and impressive biodiversity. And few places represent the best the country has to offer better than Tortuguero National Park, which Zegrahm visits as a...

Panama Canal, Panama
June 8, 2017
Blog Post

Panama City’s Biomuseo is a perfect starting point for learning about Panama Canal history.

This informative, Frank Gehry-designed biodiversity museum places the Central American isthmus of Panama at the center of…well, everything. It leaves no doubt that this narrow land bridge uniting the Americas has played a unique, perhaps outsized role in the natural, social...

Embera Girls, Darien Province, Panama
May 9, 2017
Blog Post

Thanks to the country’s role as a bridge between North and South America, people have always come from all over the world to settle in Panama. As a result, the cultures of Panama are striking in terms of their sheer diversity. 

There are seven unique indigenous cultures of Panama, which make up about 13% of the country’s population (currently around 4 million). These cultures are typically divided into four major groups based on language, traditions, and locations...

Cartagena, Colombia
May 3, 2017
Blog Post

Latin America is a collection of countries encompassing everything between the northern end of Mexico and the southern end of South America, as well as numerous Caribbean islands. The history of Latin America is remarkably rich, with colonialism creating regionally unique blends of traditional indigenous cultures and European influences.

Latin...

Isla Coiba, Panama
March 23, 2017
Blog Post

Snorkeling the protected waters around Isla Coiba, one encounters colorful parrotfish, red squirrelfish, and yellow pufferfish, along with grouper, rays, and three species of turtle. Located about 15 miles off the southern coast of Panama, Central America’s largest island is encircled by 335 acres of vibrant coral reef, the second largest in the Eastern Pacific. A new species of coral, Pacifigorgia marviva,...

Kiel Canal, Germany
January 11, 2017
Blog Post

With all the gridlock on our roadways, we forget that some of the world’s busiest transportation routes aren’t even on dry land. The oldest-known canals date back to 4000 BC in Mesopotamia, where they were used for irrigation. Yet these artificial waterways have played an even more crucial economic role in the development of civilization. By utilizing a series of locks, dams, and other engineered structures, canals create alternative freight channels and regulate maritime traffic of...

Discover Cuba
September 29, 2016
Blog Post

Columbus left Spain in 1492 and, after first landing in the Bahamas, continued on to visit Cuba’s shores. There he found thick vegetation and peaceful Taino Indians, who had inhabited the island for at least 3,000 years. Within the next two decades, the Spanish Empire would wipe out most of the indigenous population and, in turn, transport upwards of 30,000 slaves from Africa to work vast plantations of cash crops, most notably sugar cane.

Between the late-...

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