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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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Japanese Tea Ceremony
October 16, 2018
Blog Post

Mark Brazil developed his fascination with the natural world, especially birds and mammals, during his boyhood in the landlocked English county of Worcestershire. He pursued academic interests in biology during studies in England and Scotland, while exploring the coasts and mountains of Britain in search of birds. Mark earned his PhD from Stirling University,...

Tripe Soup, Romania
November 29, 2016
Blog Post

Situated on the crossroads of East and West, Romania has been conquered and occupied by a variety of different civilizations over the centuries—Greek, Roman, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian—while trade with other European countries, such as France, Italy, Poland, and Russia, have also had a profound effect on the language and culture of Romania. Today, this mélange of cultural influences are evident in traditional Romanian food.

On our upcoming expedition,...

Almaty, Kazakhstan
November 16, 2016
Blog Post

As a young man, the 14th-century Turko-Mongol military leader Timur sustained crippling injuries to his right hand and hip. The latter caused a rather severe limp, earning him the nickname Timur-e Lang or “Timur the Lame”—the origin of his European moniker, Tamerlane.

Yet while he may have been lame, the infamous warlord was far from feeble. Tall and broad shouldered, Timur (which means “iron”) displayed a shrewd intelligence and increasing brutality as he forged an empire...

Klaipeda, Lithuania
November 16, 2016
Blog Post

Like silk, amber was once considered so valuable that it earned a namesake trade route. Stretching from the Baltic coast across Bohemia to the Danube—then forking on to Greece, Italy, the Black Sea, and beyond to Asia Minor—the Amber Route dates from the Bronze Age, when merchants exchanged the semi-precious stone for ceramics, glassware, copper, and coins of silver and gold. In turn, amber was used to make jewelry and decorative pieces, perfumes and folkloric potions.

Amber,...

Tallinn, Estonia
November 1, 2016
Blog Post

The news of the day is filled with trade agreements, financial influence, the effects of capitalism, and growing competition from outsiders. Welcome to Northern Europe circa 1400.

During the Middle Ages, trading towns around the Continent developed a burgeoning middle class of merchants, or burghers, and skilled artisans. As these towns grew in wealth and power, many banded together to protect their commodities and crafts against...

Australia's Kimberley
October 28, 2016
Blog Post

As we put our finishing touches on our upcoming expedition to Australia’s remote Kimberley region, you might say our expert field staff is getting “stoked” (excited). For one, they’ll be joined by Richard Gilmore, Australia division director of The Nature Conservancy, who will offer his insights through a series of lectures...

Bran Castle
October 28, 2016
Blog Post

Despite numerous natural and cultural attractions—including seven Saxon-built fortified churches and the historic center of Sighisoara, designated as UNESCO World Heritage Sites—the Transylvania region of central Romania is forever linked with the infamous legend of Dracula.

Romanians can thank (and for many years, they cursed) Irish author Bram Stoker for that notorious distinction. It was his Gothic horror novel, Dracula, published in 1897, that gave...

Vietnamese Pho
October 20, 2016
Blog Post

Michael Moore has been working with us for nearly a decade; he earned both his BS in biology and an MS degree in ecology, ethology, and evolution at the University of Illinois. As an expedition leader, Mike has led travelers everywhere from the equatorial forests of New Guinea to the Great White Continent of Antarctica, and many places in between. We recently caught...

Tiger, India
October 6, 2016
Blog Post

Living amidst the forests of Asia, tigers are the largest felids on Earth, reaching up to 12 feet in length and upwards of 575 pounds. They are also one of the most critically endangered species, occupying less than 7 percent of their historic geographic range.

Perhaps the best place on the planet to see these incredible creatures is India; indeed, it is home to nearly half of the remaining cats in the wild. Thanks to a highly successful conservation effort,...

Discover Cuba
September 29, 2016
Blog Post

Columbus left Spain in 1492 and, after first landing in the Bahamas, continued on to visit Cuba’s shores. There he found thick vegetation and peaceful Taino Indians, who had inhabited the island for at least 3,000 years. Within the next two decades, the Spanish Empire would wipe out most of the indigenous population and, in turn, transport upwards of 30,000 slaves from Africa to work vast plantations of cash crops, most notably sugar cane.

Between the late-...

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