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Zegrahm Expeditions Travel Resources

Welcome to the Zegrahm Expeditions resources page! Here you will find inspiration for your next adventure and information from your last adventure, produced by our field leaders, Seattle office staff, and contributing writers. From blog posts and field reports (daily recaps of a past expeditions with images) to photo galleries and videos, explore your world from our perspective.

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Rangiroa, Tuamotu Islands
September 16, 2008
Blog Post

Lanky palms, ultramarine waters, soaring peaks, a rich cultural heritage, a celebrated list of visitors-turned-residents–and all of it blended with that French je ne sais quoi…makes Tahiti the perfect beginning and end point for an adventure that will take us counter-clockwise around Polynesia.

We began our first full day driving the island's outer ring road that follows the dazzling coast and offers incredible inland views of verdant valleys and rugged peaks. Our amicable Tahitian...

Bristle-thighed curlews
September 11, 2008
Blog Post

Malden and Starbuck Islands are the northernmost islands of the southern part of the Line Islands in the Republic of Kiribati. Both Malden and Starbuck are coral atolls and were mined extensively from the late 1800s until the early 1900s for phosphates. Phosphate deposits are guano deposited by seabirds over the countless years that the islands have stood above the surface of the sea. Used for fertilizers and during WWII for explosives, guano contains about...

Salt Flats in Bolivia
June 6, 2008
Blog Post

Bolivia is a country like no other. Our exploration of this highest, poorest, and least known South American nation proved to be that perfect blend of travel and adventure: some of our pre-conceptions enhanced, and others shattered.

Never ones to enjoy “down time” in an exotic locale, on our first day in La Paz we transformed our “morning at leisure” into a dawn excursion along the famous crossing to Coroico, known as “The Most Dangerous Road on Earth.” Climbing out of the high city...

Panama Canal, Panama
February 20, 2008
Blog Post

Our 2008 Rainforests and Reefs expedition to Belize, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama recently returned and we are excited to share with you some video footage of our transit through the Panama Canal onboard Le Levant. As you can see from the entry below, it was a truly memorable day. 

Our Panama Canal Transit
Sort the travel destinations of the world by any criteria you...

Bigge Island
January 19, 2008
Blog Post

More than 50,000 years ago Australia’s original inhabitants arrived from Sundaland (Southeast Asia). They arrived in the area we now call the Kimberley, the northwest corner of the land of Sahul, or greater Australia. How and why they came here is the subject of great conjecture and debate but it is certain that they had to make significant sea crossings to do so. These were, in all probability, the first open sea journeys undertaken by homo sapiens—in an ancient time that surely...

Palm Trees
October 19, 2007
Blog Post

The coconut palm—that elegant lanky symbol for tropical island paradise—is also one of the most fascinating trees on the planet. Its statistics honor the Cocos nucifera—literally monkey-face nut fruit—with superlatives: It has the largest leaf in the plant kingdom, the largest seed, the largest inflorescence (flower cluster), and is one of the oldest known flowering plants—fossils date it back to some 120 million years ago, to the Cretaceous period, or Age of Dinosaurs.

No one is...

Kofiau Archipelago, Raja Ampat
October 19, 2007
Blog Post

Growing up in southeastern Pennsylvania, there was neither an ocean nor was the term biodiversity ever used. But I was fascinated with fish. Like my Dad and Grandpa Grove, I loved to go fishing in the local streams and the Susquehanna River for rainbow trout, shad, and bass. During summer vacations on the Atlantic coast, croaker, blue fish, and flounder danced in my dreams, and sometimes on the end of my line. I was also enthralled watching fish in aquariums; I even had one of my own in...

Amphoras at the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology
April 19, 2007
Blog Post

In 1960, George F. Bass, then a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, learned to dive in order to excavate a Bronze Age shipwreck off Cape Gelidonya, on Turkey's southern coast. This was the first scientific excavation of a site beneath the water, and not only represented a revolution in archaeology, but also helped rewrite scholars' understanding of ancient trade in the Mediterranean three thousand years ago.

The example...

January 19, 2007
Blog Post

If it's a given that the best moments of a journey happen spontaneously, then the Expedition Stop day on a Zegrahm itinerary is surely serendipity in its finest hour. In our brochures, among the carefully crafted day by day descriptions, those words dangle a tantalizing lure to those of us easily reeled in by the promise of adventure.

I recently had the pleasure of joining my first Zegrahm voyage-Brunei to Bali-aboard the Clipper Odyssey. First times to any...

Inspiring Indochina
April 19, 2006
Blog Post

Kim Saunders has lived in Hong Kong and Indonesia and is a current resident of Singapore. A passionate student of Asian culture, with a special interest and expertise in regional textiles, she is a frequent lecturer with Zegrahm, energetically leading groups into local markets, and promoting appreciation for locally produced handicrafts.

I've been hooked on Indochina for a long time now, and our recent October journey to Cambodia and Vietnam served to emphasize the...

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