Brazil: Rivers of the Amazonian Rainforest

Anavilhanas National Park, Brazil
September 19, 2017
18 Days
Overland Adventure
12 Guests
From $17,480
Pink River Dolphin, Rio Negro

Expedition Highlights

  • Join ornithologist Mark Brazil on a brand-new itinerary, exploring some of Brazil’s lesser-traveled rivers and pristine Amazonian rainforest.
  • Spend five days exploring Rio Roosevelt (River of Doubt); this untouched wilderness is a paradise for bird enthusiasts, with nearly 500 recorded species.   
  • Search for unique Amazonian wildlife in the Mamiraua Reserve, home to pink river dolphins, hoatzins, and two endemic primates—the bald uakari and black-headed squirrel monkey.  
  • Meet locals to learn about daily life in the rainforest, the traditional uses of various plants, and shop for handicrafts.
  • Explore the Anavilhanas Archipelago on the Rio Negro, one of the largest freshwater archipelagos in the world. 

Expedition Team

Trip Preparation: Gear Up!

  • Water & Trail Shoe
Crush Water & Trail Shoe

The Amazon rainforest is no match for your Crush Water & Trail Shoe; made from the most rugged of materials and with a sure grip for wet rocks, a quick-drying upper to shrug off the wear and tear of the trail and a crushable heel allows for slip-on wear. Water drains out quickly when you step onto terra firma. 

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